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Microbes get a bad rap, but only a fraction of them cause disease, while some are integral to human health, coalescing to form the microbiome — the community of microbes that take up residence in the body. The human microbiome is receiving a flood of attention for its potential role in every aspect of health. Melissa M. Some species of bacteria promote a healthy vaginal environment.

For example, lactobacilli play a major role in regulating vaginal pH, creating an acidic environment hostile to microbes responsible for diseases like trichomoniasis and bacterial vaginosis. And women with lactobacilli-dominant vaginal microbiomes are more likely to prevent or clear human papillomavirus infections. However, when the vaginal ecosystem is thrown off balance — a condition called dysbiosis — the vagina may be more susceptible to disease.

Although inflammation is a normal part of the immune response, in which the body fights against injuries or infections, chronic inflammation can damage tissue and DNA, setting the stage for tumor formation. The bacterial communities thriving in the vagina could be laying the groundwork for health — or for cancer and other diseases. Endometrial cancer, which strikes the lining of the uterus, is projected to cause more than 12, deaths in Her lab could be the first to clarify the association between the vaginal microbiome and endometrial cancer risk, particularly when it comes to questions about causation.

For example, patients being treated for endometrial cancer are less likely to have thriving communities of vaginal lactobacilli. Is the imbalance in their vaginal microbiomes a cause of cancer — or is it an effect of cancer?

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This chicken-or-egg conundrum adds confusion to another type of cancer as well: cervical cancer. Fortunately, the immune system vanquishes the majority of HPV infections, with only a small percentage progressing to precancer and, ultimately, cancer. But why do some people clear the infection while others are unable to fight it? To answer that question, a Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz and her team studied premenopausal women to find links between vaginal bacteria and cervical cancer.

The women with the most severe cervical abnormalities were more likely to have the lowest lactobacilli populations — and on the flip side, flourishing lactobacilli communities tended to be found in women without cervical precancer or cancer. Sneathia are rod-shaped bacteria that have been associated with other gynecological conditions, including bacterial vaginosis, miscarriage, preterm labor, HPV infection and cervical precancer.

Roughly half of the patients studied were Hispanic, while the other half were of non-Hispanic origin. Hispanic women have the highest incidence of cervical cancer of all racial and ethnic groups.

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Studies assessing factors such as race and ethnicity in cancer risk are important for understanding why some populations are disproportionately affected by cancer. A long-term goal of mine is to help address that health disparity.

The team found that Hispanic women were more likely to have decreased Lactobacillus populations and increased Sneathia populations.

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Herbst-Kralovetz adds that her team recently received funding to expand their study to include Native American women. The bacteria that make up the vaginal microbiome are inextricably linked to the acidity of the vaginal environment. A vagina with a pH of 4. When pH is elevated, harmful bacteria gain the opportunity to move in, disrupting the vaginal ecosystem.

The team is the first to show a relationship between elevated pH and advanced cervical abnormalities. Instead of trying to eliminate bad bugs, what if we could nurture the good bacteria that are associated with health? Yogurt, for example, is often touted as a home remedy for yeast infections and other gynecological conditions. Knowing more about the relationship between the vaginal microbiome and cancer development could lead to methods to detect cancer in its earliest stages.

Herbst-Kralovetz is developing ways to harness knowledge about the microbiome-cancer connection and turn it into better ways to prevent, diagnose and treat cervical cancer. These fingerprints change as disease progresses, potentially giving future doctors more precise tools for diagnosis. By identifying these fingerprints, Dr. Herbst-Kralovetz and her team have found a way to develop a better understanding of how HPV infection progresses to cancer.

Microbes still have a bad rap, but the Local Arizona pussy century is witnessing a growing appreciation for the benefits bacteria can bring. As Dr. This research was supported by the Flinn Foundation Grant Nos. Tomorrow is here. Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz of the UArizona College of Medicine — Phoenix links an off-kilter vaginal microbiome to increased gynecological cancer risk. By Anna C. Christensen, MPH October 25, You are here Home. Which came first: Bad bugs or cancer? Promoting an acidic environment The bacteria that make up the vaginal microbiome are inextricably linked to the acidity of the vaginal environment.

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