The giver of pleasure

Added: Tejay Eckard - Date: 17.11.2021 01:26 - Views: 42100 - Clicks: 4784

One of the most important themes in The Giver is the ificance of memory to human life. Lowry was inspired to write The Giver after a visit to her aging father, who had lost most of his long-term memory. She realized that without memory, there is no pain—if you cannot remember physical pain, you might as well not have experienced it, and you cannot be plagued by regret or grief if you cannot remember the events that hurt you. At some point in the past the community in The Giver decided to eliminate all pain from their lives.

Not only did this allow them to forget all of the pain that had been suffered throughout human history, it also prevented members of the society from wanting to engage in activities and relationships that could result in conflict and suffering, and eliminated any nostalgia for the things the community gave up in order to live in total peace and harmony. According to the novel, however, memory is essential.

The giver of pleasure

The Committee of Elders does recognize the practical applications of memory—if you do not remember your errors, you may repeat them—so it deates a Receiver to remember history for the community. But as Jonas undergoes his training, he learns that just as there is no pain without memory, there is also no true happiness.

Related to the theme of memory is the idea that there can be no pleasure without pain and no pain without pleasure. No matter how delightful an experience is, you cannot value the pleasure it gives you unless you have some memory of a time when you have suffered.

The giver of pleasure

Similarly, they do not feel pain or grief because they do not appreciate the true wonder of life: death is not tragic to them because life is not precious. When Jonas receives memories from the Giver, the memories of pain open him to the idea of love and comfort as much as the memories of pleasure do. At the Ceremony of Twelve, the community celebrates the differences between the twelve-year-old children for the first time in their lives. For many children, twelve is an age when they are struggling to carve out a distinct identity for themselves, differentiating themselves from their parents and peers.

The novel can even be seen as an allegory for this process of maturation: twelve-year-old Jonas rejects a society where everyone is the same to follow his own path. The novel encourages readers to celebrate differences instead of disparaging them or pretending they do not exist. Pointedly, the community has rules instead of laws.

The giver of pleasure

In this sense, the relationship between the government of the community to its citizens is that of an authoritative parent instead of a governing body. Within the novel, rituals tend to surround the moments in which community members can express limited emotions, such as dreams, aging, and death. These rituals almost always work to expel the emotions involved. Other rituals, like the Ceremony of Loss or the morning dream-telling, also work to erase uncomfortable emotions, such as the grief of losing a community member or the confusing sexual longing in an erotic dream like the one Jonas has.

The giver of pleasure

Community members even ritualize the process of apologizing, requiring that after an apology, the wronged party must accept the apology and erase any feeling of wrongdoing. The calming effect of these rituals prevents people from fully experiencing the limited emotions they can feel within the community.

Ace your asments with our guide to The Giver! Want study tips sent straight to your inbox? SparkTeach Teacher's Handbook. Main Ideas Themes.

The giver of pleasure

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Next section Motifs. Popular s: The Giver.

The giver of pleasure

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The giver of pleasure

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